Enhancing the Performance of Canadian Paddlers via Inertial Measurement Units

Josh Goreham is a PhD in Health student studying sport biomechanics at Dalhousie University. He measures sport technique using inertial measurement units, with the goal of helping enhance the performance of Canadian canoe kayak sprint athletes.

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Rediscovering New Brunswick: A Story of W.F. Ganong

Given his contributions to New Brunswick, It is difficult to describe W.F Ganong as anything short of a polymath. His work in botany- authoring four widely printed textbooks on the matter, his renowned work as an incisive cartographer (hand drafted maps), his publishing’s on settlement and exploration of the Atlantic coastline and even the remarkable exploits of his son, a pioneering physician in neuroendocrinology, collectively testify to his stature.

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Measuring Physical Health Needs for Older Adults

Canada’s older adult population, those 65 and older, is increasing; more specifically, New Brunswick has one of the largest older adult populations in Canada [1]. This is concerning because as these individuals age, their ability to live independently may decrease – meaning they will be unable to live on their own.

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Retrotransposons: a Balancing Act at the Genome Scale

The Human Genome Project (HGP) began in 1990 and remains one of the most major international biological endeavours of our time. Over the span of 13 years, researchers from 20 different centres across 6 countries, came together and successfully mapped nearly all 3 billion base pairs of the human genome with its approximately 30 000 genes [1]. Accompanying these advancements were the development of new DNA analysis technologies that could be used on massive genome-scale projects. The HGP has since fuelled the discovery of more than 1800 disease genes, and allowed for the development of now more than 2000 tests for various genetic conditions [2].

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Obesity: A Hot Topic

You’ve likely heard that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic, but what exactly does that mean? Obesity is a term used to describe excess body fat accumulation to the point in which it is accompanied by adverse health effects. To be classified as obese, one must have a body mass index (BMI) of above 30, which takes into consideration both a person’s height and weight. Statistics Canada estimates that one in four adult Canadians (approximately 6.3 million Canadians) were classified as obese in 2012, an increase of 17.5% from 2003. With rapidly increasing rates of obesity, focus is starting to shift towards addressing this issue.

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Understanding Research to Build a Better Future

Improving health care, adjusting policies, and allowing research to make an impact is vital for advancing our technologies to meet our new needs. As communities grow larger, and new problems arise, technology must adapt to be effective. People that work on tackling integration of new technology into society are known as Translational Scientists. Dr. Keith Brunt, a Translational Scientist with IMPART labs, and a faculty member in Medicine and Business at Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick and UNBSJ has first-hand experience in the area of translational medicine and understands its importance for the future.

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Using Biomarkers to Detect Vaccine Success

The exploration of Biomarkers is a novel field of research, and potentially offers many answers for health researchers. Biomarkers are biological indicators that help confirm whether or not something of interest occurs, for example, they can act as an early predictor of vaccination success, as opposed to waiting longer periods of time to evaluate whether the disease is completely eliminated. Some of the latest research looking into using biomarkers as indicators of vaccine success is done in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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Tools for Success: Building Tools for Better Quality of Care

With 19.5% of the population being aged 65 or older, New Brunswick has the highest proportion of older adults in Canada and it is projected that by 2026 this will rise to 25.7% of the population.  In 2016, there were 67 nursing homes, and 390 special care homes providing residential care. With a large proportion of the population living in long-term care, it is important to know how to care for patients and their needs, including choices and interactions between staff and the patient.

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Vergence Adaptation & Vision Rehabilitation

Vergence eye movements allow us to change our depth of focus and see in 3D. The ability to recalibrate these eye movements is crucial for accurate depth perception in different visual environments, just as adaptation is crucial in many other aspects of our success and survival. With virtual and augmented reality technology becoming increasingly popular, understanding the adaptive capacities of vergence eye movements has never been more important.

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An Interview with Dr. Chris McGibbon

I was fortunate enough to be able to sit down with Dr. Chris McGibbon, Research Chair in Rehabilitation Biomechanics at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Kinesiology to talk about his career; how he got here, and what drives his success.

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Causes and Consequences of the Miramichi Salmon Decline

Since the 80s, the number of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) returning to the Miramichi River have experienced a drastic decrease compared to previous years. According to Department of Fisheries and Oceans from 1992 to 2014 the Miramichi watershed has seen a 93.5% decrease in the number of returning Atlantic Salmon!

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Seek Onward: A Journey delving into Paleoecology

It is common to wonder, how has our environment changed and how have we changed with it? What initiated or facilitated these changes? These intertwined questions are complex and comprehensive answers demand that Paleoecologists utilize all available pieces of ancient environments; only then offering a glimpse into the past. Take a look into Dr. Les Cwynar's research of Paleoecology. 

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Changing how Discoveries are Made

Science is built upon discoveries and building evidence to support a theory. Individual researchers publish results based on their data and then others use this information to guide their own research. The process works, but how efficiently? Does this methodology truly reflect the potential of the 21st century?

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