WhiteFeather Hunter: An Artistic Interpretation of Biology

To the average person, science and art are two directly opposing fields. At first glance, science seems as if it is solely concerned with empirical facts and research, while art seemingly  has little application outside of creative expression. However, upon taking a deeper look, it is difficult to imagine a world in which one could function without the other.

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The Professional Journey of Dr. Tony Reiman

Dr. Reiman didn’t always dream of entering the medical profession. As a student at UNB taking a double major in Biology and Physics, Reiman’s earlier interests were based in technological development and innovation, rather than medicine. Today, Dr. Tony Reiman is nothing short of a hero in our community. In addition to easing the suffering of cancer patients as an oncologist at the Saint John Regional Hospital, he holds various titles such as Canadian Cancer Society Research Chair and Assistant Dean of Research at Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick (DMNB) to name a few.”

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Enhancing the Performance of Canadian Paddlers via Inertial Measurement Units

Josh Goreham is a PhD in Health student studying sport biomechanics at Dalhousie University. He measures sport technique using inertial measurement units, with the goal of helping enhance the performance of Canadian canoe kayak sprint athletes.

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Measuring Physical Health Needs for Older Adults

Canada’s older adult population, those 65 and older, is increasing; more specifically, New Brunswick has one of the largest older adult populations in Canada [1]. This is concerning because as these individuals age, their ability to live independently may decrease – meaning they will be unable to live on their own.

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Obesity: A Hot Topic

You’ve likely heard that we are in the midst of an obesity epidemic, but what exactly does that mean? Obesity is a term used to describe excess body fat accumulation to the point in which it is accompanied by adverse health effects. To be classified as obese, one must have a body mass index (BMI) of above 30, which takes into consideration both a person’s height and weight. Statistics Canada estimates that one in four adult Canadians (approximately 6.3 million Canadians) were classified as obese in 2012, an increase of 17.5% from 2003. With rapidly increasing rates of obesity, focus is starting to shift towards addressing this issue.

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Understanding Research to Build a Better Future

Improving health care, adjusting policies, and allowing research to make an impact is vital for advancing our technologies to meet our new needs. As communities grow larger, and new problems arise, technology must adapt to be effective. People that work on tackling integration of new technology into society are known as Translational Scientists. Dr. Keith Brunt, a Translational Scientist with IMPART labs, and a faculty member in Medicine and Business at Dalhousie Medicine New Brunswick and UNBSJ has first-hand experience in the area of translational medicine and understands its importance for the future.

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Using Biomarkers to Detect Vaccine Success

The exploration of Biomarkers is a novel field of research, and potentially offers many answers for health researchers. Biomarkers are biological indicators that help confirm whether or not something of interest occurs, for example, they can act as an early predictor of vaccination success, as opposed to waiting longer periods of time to evaluate whether the disease is completely eliminated. Some of the latest research looking into using biomarkers as indicators of vaccine success is done in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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Tools for Success: Building Tools for Better Quality of Care

With 19.5% of the population being aged 65 or older, New Brunswick has the highest proportion of older adults in Canada and it is projected that by 2026 this will rise to 25.7% of the population.  In 2016, there were 67 nursing homes, and 390 special care homes providing residential care. With a large proportion of the population living in long-term care, it is important to know how to care for patients and their needs, including choices and interactions between staff and the patient.

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Vergence Adaptation & Vision Rehabilitation

Vergence eye movements allow us to change our depth of focus and see in 3D. The ability to recalibrate these eye movements is crucial for accurate depth perception in different visual environments, just as adaptation is crucial in many other aspects of our success and survival. With virtual and augmented reality technology becoming increasingly popular, understanding the adaptive capacities of vergence eye movements has never been more important.

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An Interview with Dr. Chris McGibbon

I was fortunate enough to be able to sit down with Dr. Chris McGibbon, Research Chair in Rehabilitation Biomechanics at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Kinesiology to talk about his career; how he got here, and what drives his success.

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Changing how Discoveries are Made

Science is built upon discoveries and building evidence to support a theory. Individual researchers publish results based on their data and then others use this information to guide their own research. The process works, but how efficiently? Does this methodology truly reflect the potential of the 21st century?

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